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ARCO Madrid 2021

Daniel Canogar & Liat Yossifor
07.07.2021 – 11.07.2021

Daniel Canogar, Draft 3 – Magna Carta, 2017, 146 x 90 x 34 cm, Edition of 3

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Daniel Canogar, Draft 1 – Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 2017, 146 x 90 x 34 cm, Edition of 3

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Daniel Canogar, Draft 2 – American Constitution, 2017, 146 x 90 x 34 cm, Edition of 3

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DANIEL CANOGAR ́s life and career have bridged between Spain and the U.S. Photography was his earliest medium of choice, receiving a M.A. from NYU at the International Center of photography in 1990, but he soon became interested in the possibilities of the projected image and installation art. Fascinated with the technological history of optical devices, Canogar created his own projection tools, with which he created multi-projection systems. For several series of works the artist has used projected video animations in order to metaphorically breath new life into salvaged obsolete electronics. His large scale video-projections have been presented on various emblematic monuments, including a generative animation projected on the Museo Nacional del Prado façade. Using flexible LED screens, he has created permanent public art installations as well as smaller-scaled projects, including the Echo Series, whose animations react to real-time data of different phenomena happening around the globe, including earthquakes, fires or environmental pollution collected by various web pages. In his data artworks Canogar showcases abstract animations developed with data from real-time Google trends, global financial index funds or news feeds. In his work Canogar re-conceptualizes media and repurposes discarded electronics to achieve his con- ceptual media sculptures and data works.

Visible on Draft´s screens are generative animations created with foundational texts of the democratic system, including the Magna Carta, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the American Constitution. These texts become progressively distorted, the result of a real-time reaction to the direction and intensity of the wind of the cities that gave birth to these texts: Runnymede, Paris and Philadelphia.

Memory, and its loss, are a central theme in my work. Unless we remember, we are condemned to an amnesiac present, textureless and flat, lacking the perspective of time.”   Daniel Canogar

Liat Yossifor, Spine, 2019, Oil on linen, 45,5 x 35,5 cm, Unique piece

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The thinking process of switching back and forth from the literal to the abstract is accelerated by the drying time. This method of compressing movement in a single time-based painting session is performative, and it is through this process that I arrive at abstraction. (…) The painting activity as a performance is in itself an attempt to overpass the fixities of representation.”   Liat Yossifor

Liat Yossifor, The Active Void, 2019, Oil on linen, 203 x 198 cm, Unique piece

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LIAT YOSSIFOR was trained at UC Irvine, California, at the height of the cultural war debates. Her work then was a series of sociopolitical portraits that were etched in great detail onto monochromatic fields. These portraits were buried in single color fields, in shades of red, white, and black. They only came to life with a certain direction of light and the position of the viewer in front of them. They were a kind of a “Dawning of an aspect,” to borrow from Wittgenstein. This work over time evolved into abstractions that are portraits of events instead of portraits of people. The new abstractions are time-restricted, repeated, and body-aware; they speak to a cycle of trauma and belatedness. Their subject is entirely a state of mind, and is formed over time by thinking of these works in groupings of paintings and memories. In these abstractions, a delicate balance between cognition and action forms a pictorial space which coexists in tension with the painting as a record of an event. The abstractions are grounded in the artist’s movement and are generated by utilizing a process that resembles automatic drawing. Yossifor attacks, scores, and interacts with the paint to create textural lines and structures that echo drawings; these drawing features are subsequently buried in the ensuing layers of paint. The work is also done entirely in paint, but describes different material states, from stone relief and ceramics to body prints.

Liat Yossifor, Letters (figure and fish), 2020, Oil on paper, 30,5 x 23,5 cm, Unique piece

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Liat Yossifor, Letters (riders), 2020, Oil on paper, 28,5 x 21,5 cm, Unique piece

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Liat Yossifor, Letters (curves), 2020, Oil on paper, 28,5 x 21,5 cm, Unique piece

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